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Can You Take 40 MG of Cialis for ED?

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Dosages are often confusing, especially when you want to get the most and best out of what you're taking. So when it comes to a big night or a weekend away, how much Cialis should you take if you have erectile dysfunction? The answer is a complicated one, but we're here to give you the run-down.

For those just starting out on ED medication, you might be unaware of the typical starting dose, as well as how it can be adjusted to fit your needs. So, let's take a look at everything to do with Cialis, the popular drug for treating erectile dysfunction.

What is Cialis?

Cialis is the brand name for tadalafil, a drug used to treat erectile dysfunction. It's a PDE5 inhibitor, meaning it inhibits the specific enzyme that regulates blood flow to the penis, allowing blood to fill the spongy erectile tissue and resulting in an erection.

What makes Cialis unique from other ED medications is its long half-life. Tadalafil remains in your system for much longer than other ED drugs (up to 36 hours), so you can take it much closer to the time you anticipate engaging in sexual activity. In other words, unlike Viagra, which is taken shortly before sex, you don't have to plan your entire sexual encounter around when you take your Cialis.

The way that Cialis works for ED is similar to how Viagra and other PDE5 inhibitors work. When you take a PDE5 inhibitor, it prevents the degradation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), a nucleotide that regulates blood flow in the penis. This prevents blood from flowing out of the penis, resulting in an erection that can last for up to four hours. 

However, Cialis is unique in that it has a much longer half-life than other ED drugs. So while Viagra and other PDE5 inhibitors are taken shortly before sex, Cialis can be taken up to 12 hours before sex, allowing more liberal usage and spontaneity in sexual encounters.

How Do I Take Cialis?

Cialis comes in four different doses: 2.5 mg, 5 mg, 10 mg, and 20 mg. The starting dose is usually 10 mg, which is taken 30-60 minutes before sexual activity. If this dose is not effective, the dose can be increased to 20 mg, if your doctor approves. If you're taking the drug for the first time, it's best to start with the lower dose so that you can see how your body reacts.

Cialis can be taken with or without food, but taking it with a high-fat meal can delay absorption. Cialis should be taken at least 30 minutes before sex, and can be taken up to 12 hours before sex. If you take it too close to your next scheduled dose, you may experience some carryover effects.

What Are the Side Effects of Cialis?

The most common side effects of Cialis are headache, flushing, and indigestion. Other side effects include back pain, muscle aches, stuffy nose, and dizziness. If you experience any of these side effects, call your doctor.

Cialis can also cause low blood pressure, which can lead to fainting. This is a rare but serious side effect, so discontinue use and call your doctor if it occurs.

Side effects of Cialis include:

  • headache
  • flushing
  • indigestion
  • back pain
  • muscle aches
  • stuffy nose
  • dizziness
  • low blood pressure
  • fainting

If you experience any serious side effects, call your doctor and discontinue use of the medication until you can be seen. The most serious side effects are rare but can include priapism (a prolonged and painful erection), sudden hearing loss, and sudden vision loss.

Can I Take 40 MG of Cialis?

The recommended starting dose of Cialis for use as needed in most patients is 10 mg, taken prior to anticipated sexual activity. The dose may be increased to 20 mg or decreased to 5 mg, based on individual efficacy and tolerability. In some patients, the dose strength and maximum frequency of use may be adjusted.

For erectile dysfunction, Cialis is usually taken only once per day. Allow 24 hours to pass between doses, due to the extended release of the medication., as well as the potential for increased side effects if more than the recommended amount is taken.

40mg would be an unusually high dose of Cialis and is not recommended. Patients taking Cialis should only do so under the supervision of a doctor, and the maximum recommended dose is 20mg.

What Are Overdose Symptoms of Cialis?

Cialis overdoses are rare and usually result in mild symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, facial flushing, and headaches. However, more serious overdoses can lead to low blood pressure, irregular heartbeat, and fainting. If you think you or someone you know has taken too much Cialis, call a poison control center or emergency room immediately, as time is of the essence.

Symptoms of a Cialis overdose may include:

  • Vomiting
  • Nausea
  • Facial flushing
  • Headache
  • Low blood pressure
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Fainting

Serious overdoses of Cialis can be life-threatening. If you think you or someone you know may have overdosed on Cialis, call 911 or a local poison control center immediately.

The Strength of a Typical Cialis Tablet

When taken as recommended in the U.S and Canada, the average adult dose of Cialis is 10 mg. This is also the recommended starting dose, although men with less-severe ED may begin with a 5 mg dose. The maximum recommended dose of Cialis is 20 mg.

Taking too much Cialis can increase the likelihood of experiencing side effects, including headache, indigestion, muscle aches, back pain, and dizziness, fainting, and an erection that lasts longer than four hours (which is considered a medical emergency.)

Overdosing on Cialis can also lead to more serious consequences, such as a heart attack or stroke. If you think you have overdosed on Cialis, seek medical attention immediately.

How Long Should I Wait Between Doses Before Taking Cialis

The recommended time between doses of tadalafil is 24 hours, as the effects of the medication can last up to 36 hours. Half-life, or the time it takes for the concentration of the drug in the body to be reduced by half, is the major determinant of how long the effects of tadalafil last. For tadalafil, the half-life is approximately 17.5 hours.

When taking tadalafil for erectile dysfunction, it's important to follow the directions on your prescription label. Do not take tadalafil more or less often, or for a different duration than what is prescribed by your doctor. Do not take tadalafil if you are also using a nitrate drug, such as nitroglycerin, for chest pain or heart problems. Taking tadalafil with a nitrate medicine can cause a sudden and serious decrease in blood pressure, especially if you have heart disease or a history of heart attack or stroke.

How Long Does It Take for Cialis to Work?

Did you know that even if you’ve taken Viagra, Cialis or Levitra, you still need to experience arousal and sexual stimulation for the medication to work? In other words, to get an erection, you still need to be sexually aroused.

Viagra, Cialis and Levitra all work by inhibiting the chemical phosphodiesterase, which leads to an increase in the level of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). cGMP is a chemical that is responsible for relaxation of smooth muscle tissue. When cGMP levels are increased, the smooth muscle tissue in the corpus cavernosum (the spongy tissue that makes up the bulk of the penis) relaxes, allowing more blood to flow into the penis, resulting in an erection.

However, all of these medications require sexual stimulation for them to work. Viagra, Cialis and Levitra will not cause an erection on their own. In other words, you still need to be aroused for the medication to work.

So, how long does it take for Viagra, Cialis or Levitra to work? The length of time varies depending on the individual. Viagra typically starts to work within 30-60 minutes, while Cialis can start to work in as little as 15-30 minutes.

Do not take more than one dose of Viagra, Cialis or Levitra in a 24-hour period, as this can lead to serious side effects. If you are still not able to get an erection after taking one of these medications, it is important to see your doctor, as there may be an underlying health condition that is causing your erectile dysfunction.

When To See a Doctor for ED

If you're taking Cialis and your erectile dysfunction is still not improving, you might want to ask your doctor about a different course of treatment. Not all medications for erectile dysfunction work the same way, and your doctor can determine if a different PDE-5 inhibitor, such as Viagra or Levitra, might work better.

If your erectile dysfunction is caused by a psychological problem, such as stress or anxiety, your doctor may refer you to a counselor or therapist. If your erectile dysfunction is due to a physical cause, such as a side effect from medication or an injury, your doctor may refer you to a urologist.

Phoenix is a telehealth company that provides online medical consultations with licensed doctors. Our doctors can prescribe Viagra and other ED medications to treat your erectile dysfunction. Request a free consultation to text-chat with a doctor online and get started on your treatment today.

This blog post is for educational purposes only and does not constitute medical or other professional advice. Your specific circumstances should be discussed with a healthcare provider. All statements of opinion represent the writers' judgement at the time of publication and are subject to change. Phoenix and its affiliates provide no express or implied endorsements of third parties or their advice, opinions, information, products, or services.

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