FATHER'S DAY PROMO: FREE ONLINE VISIT. START FREE VISIT

Is It a Wart or Herpes?

Reading time -
5
min

It's a common worry when you spot something unusual on your skin - is it a harmless wart or something more serious like herpes? Thankfully, understanding the differences between these two skin conditions is easier than you may think. 

In this article, we will dive into the characteristics of both warts and herpes and give you the tools to determine which one you may be dealing with. So, get ready to put your worries aside and learn how to spot the differences between these two skin conditions.

What is HPV?

HPV stands for Human Papillomavirus. It is a sexually transmitted virus that is one of the most common causes of sexually transmitted infections in the world. HPV can lead to a variety of health problems, including genital warts, cervical cancer, and other types of cancer. Some strains of HPV are more dangerous than others, and can cause more serious health problems. However, there are vaccines available that can protect against some of the most dangerous strains of HPV, so it is important to talk to your doctor about getting vaccinated.

What Does HPV Look Like?

HPV is a virus that is not visible to the naked eye, so it is not possible to see the virus itself. However, in some cases, HPV can cause physical symptoms that are visible. For example, some strains of HPV can cause genital warts, which are small fleshy growths on the genital area. Genital warts can look like tiny bumps, clusters of bumps, or flat patches. They can be flesh-colored or slightly pink and can be raised or flat. In some cases, genital warts can be itchy or painful, but in other cases, they may not cause any symptoms at all.

Other strains of HPV can cause changes in the cells of the cervix, which can be detected through a pap test or HPV test. These changes can lead to cervical cancer, but with early detection and treatment, the chances of a successful outcome are much higher.

It is important to remember that not everyone who has HPV will have visible symptoms, and many people with HPV will not even know they have it. That is why it is so important to get regular check-ups and screenings, and to talk to your doctor about your sexual health.

Stigmas Surrounding HPV

There is still a significant amount of stigma surrounding HPV, despite it being a common and highly prevalent sexually transmitted infection (STI). Some of the most common stigmas surrounding HPV include:

Shame and embarrassment: Many people feel embarrassed or ashamed about having HPV, especially if they develop genital warts. This can lead to feelings of isolation and self-doubt.

Blame: Some people with HPV may be blamed for their infection, as if it were their own fault. This can be especially true for women, who may be accused of being promiscuous or not taking proper precautions.

Misunderstanding: There is still a lot of misinformation and misunderstanding surrounding HPV, which can contribute to stigmas and misconceptions. For example, some people may believe that HPV only affects women or that it is rare.

Lack of education: Many people are not properly educated about HPV, which can lead to stigmas and misunderstandings. Lack of education can also lead to people not seeking medical attention when they need it, out of fear or shame.

What Is Herpes?

Herpes is a viral infection caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV). There are two types of herpes simplex virus: HSV-1, which typically causes oral herpes, and HSV-2, which typically causes genital herpes.

Herpes is highly contagious and spreads easily through skin-to-skin contact, especially during an outbreak when blisters or sores are present. Outbreaks can cause pain, itching, and burning sensations. In between outbreaks, the virus remains dormant in the body and can reactivate later, causing another outbreak.

Herpes cannot be cured, but medications can help control outbreaks and reduce the risk of spreading the virus to others. It is important to practice safe sex and to disclose your herpes status to your partner if you have it. People with herpes can still have a healthy and fulfilling sex life with proper precautions and communication.

What Does Herpes Look Like On The Genitals?

Genital herpes outbreaks can cause a variety of physical symptoms. During an outbreak, you may experience:

  • Blisters or sores on the genital area, anus, or thighs
  • Itching, burning, or tingling sensations in the genital area
  • Pain or discomfort during urination
  • Flu-like symptoms, such as fever, headache, and muscle aches

The blisters or sores caused by genital herpes can look like small, fluid-filled bumps that eventually burst and form painful, open sores. The sores can be red and irritated, and may be accompanied by swelling and tenderness. In some cases, the sores may be so small that they are difficult to see.

What Does Herpes Look Like On The Mouth?

Oral herpes, caused by the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), can cause blisters or sores on the lips, mouth, tongue, or gums. The symptoms of oral herpes can vary from person to person, but common signs of an outbreak include:

Small, fluid-filled blisters or sores on or around the mouth

Itching or burning sensations in the mouth

Pain or discomfort when eating or drinking

Swollen, tender lymph nodes in the neck or jaw area

Flu-like symptoms, such as fever, headache, and muscle aches

The blisters or sores caused by oral herpes can look like small, raised red bumps that eventually burst and form painful, open sores. The sores can be accompanied by redness, swelling, and tenderness, and may be so small that they are difficult to see. 

Stigmas Surrounding Herpes

Despite being a widespread and manageable condition, it still carries a significant amount of stigma and misinformation. People with herpes often face discrimination, shame, and social isolation due to the persistent negative beliefs and attitudes about the condition. Some common stigmas surrounding herpes include:

It's a sign of promiscuity or uncleanliness: This is a false and damaging belief that associates herpes with moral or personal failing.

It's only sexually transmitted: While herpes is primarily spread through sexual contact, it can also be spread through non-sexual means, such as sharing towels or through skin-to-skin contact.

It's rare: In reality, herpes is quite common, affecting approximately one in six people in the U.S. alone.

These stigmas can prevent people from seeking testing, treatment, and support, and can cause unnecessary emotional distress. It's important to educate ourselves and others about the facts surrounding herpes and to challenge harmful stigmas.

How To Differentiate Between HPV and Herpes

Differentiating between HPV and herpes can be challenging, as both viruses can cause similar physical symptoms. However, there are some key differences between the two that can help you determine which virus you may have:

Location: HPV is typically associated with genital warts and can cause changes in the cells of the cervix, while herpes is typically associated with blisters or sores on the genital area or mouth.

Appearance: Genital warts caused by HPV can appear as small, fleshy growths on the genital area, while herpes outbreaks can cause blisters or sores that are fluid-filled and painful.

Transmission: HPV is primarily transmitted through sexual contact, while herpes is highly contagious and can be transmitted through skin-to-skin contact during an outbreak.

Treatment: There is no cure for HPV or herpes, but medications can help control outbreaks and reduce the risk of spreading the virus to others.

The Bottom Line

It is important to see a doctor if you think you may have HPV or herpes, as an accurate diagnosis can only be made by a healthcare professional. Your doctor may perform a physical examination and/or laboratory tests to determine which virus you have, and to rule out other possible causes of the symptoms you are experiencing.

Hair Loss?
No problem

Let’s help you Rise Again
Start Your Assessment

Got ED?
No problem

Let’s help you Rise Again
Start Your Assessment
This blog post is for educational purposes only and does not constitute medical or other professional advice. Your specific circumstances should be discussed with a healthcare provider. All statements of opinion represent the writers' judgement at the time of publication and are subject to change. Phoenix and its affiliates provide no express or implied endorsements of third parties or their advice, opinions, information, products, or services.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Receive a weekly newsletters with insightful tips and resources

Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.