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What Are the Different Regions of the Scalp?

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The scalp has a lot going on, more than you may already know. Each part of the scalp has an important job to do from the hair growth cycle to the sebaceous glands. Understanding the different regions of your scalp can help you better care for your hair and scalp.

Many men experience hair loss as they age, and the location of the hair loss is often an indication of the cause. This brief article will shed some light on the four regions of the scalp, and what hair loss means in each one.

The Four Regions of the Scalp

There are four regions of the scalp: the frontal region, the parietal region, the occipital region, and the temporal region.

1. The Frontal Region

This area is located in front of your ears and extends to your hairline. The frontal scalp is responsible for producing most of the oil that keeps your hair healthy-looking and free from dirt and dust. The frontal region is also where hair loss begins for many men as they age.

Hair loss in the front of the scalp is often the most noticeable, which is why it's just unlucky that that's where most men with male pattern baldness lose their hair.

It often begins with a receding hairline, and then the hair on top of the head starts to thin out. If you're experiencing hair loss in the frontal region, it's best to see a doctor to find out what might be causing it, but it's most likely caused by the male pattern baldness gene.

This common type of hair loss is generally caused by hormones and can't be reversed, but there are treatments available that can help you keep your hair, like Finasteride or Rogaine (minoxidil).

2. The Parietal Region

This is the area of your scalp that's located above your ears and extends to the middle of your head. The parietal region contains a lot of hair follicles, which is why it's one tough area to transplant hair from if you're balding. The parietal region is also home to the "occipital ridge," which is that bony bump on the back of your head.

Hair loss in this region is usually caused by a combination of genes and aging, which can lead to baldness in both men and women. It's not as common as hair loss in the frontal region, but it's still something to be aware of.

3. The Occipital Region

This is the back part of your scalp and the area where you'll find most of your hair follicles.

The occipital scalp is located at the base of your skull and is often one of the last places to lose hair as you age.

Hair loss in this region can be caused by a variety of things, including genes, aging, stress, medical conditions, and some medications. Hair loss in the occipital region is often temporary and will go away once the underlying cause is treated.

4. The Temporal Region

This is the area of your scalp that's located in front of your ears and extends to just behind them.

The temporal scalp is responsible for producing the oil that keeps your hair shiny and conditioned. The temporal region also contains a lot of nerve cells, which explains why it's one of the most sensitive areas to damage when you experience inflammation or pain in your scalp.

Hair loss in this area can be caused by various factors, like hormonal changes, environmental pollutants (such as hair dye), and some medical conditions. Treatment for this type of hair loss usually depends on the cause.

Conclusion

The four regions of the scalp are responsible for many functions and can be affected by hair loss in a variety of ways. If you're experiencing hair loss in any one of these areas, it's best to see a doctor in order to figure out what might be causing it and get started on treatment.

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This blog post is for educational purposes only and does not constitute medical or other professional advice. Your specific circumstances should be discussed with a healthcare provider. All statements of opinion represent the writers' judgement at the time of publication and are subject to change. Phoenix and its affiliates provide no express or implied endorsements of third parties or their advice, opinions, information, products, or services.

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